I got bored so I designed a case  

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Jester
(@jester)
Member Moderator

Warning! This is an extremely crude rendering since I have never done such a thing before and I used Google Sketchup!

So don't get your hopes up. This is the first time I ever rendered something and I used a woefully simple program. Anyways, lets move on.

I designed an extended ATX case (to put it mildly) using Google Sketchup. The primary inspirations for this case were the Silverstone TJ07 (shape/body, compartmentalized design), the Cooler Master HAF-X (air ducts, hot swappable drive bays) and the Cooler Master ATCS 840/EVGA SR-2 case (EVGA SR-2 Classified compatibility, motherboard tray design).

All of these cases have drawbacks. The Silverstone TJ07 has bad airflow and is outdated overall (drive bay design, only two top 120mm fan mounts and two 120mm rear fan mounts, outdated MOBO tray design). It also has bad cable management. The ATCS 840 just needs thicker side panels and better stock cooling. The HAF-X is the best of them all in my opinion and the only drawbacks are the lack of dust filters on the bottom. This is an easy fix as you can just put the top dust filters onto the bottom of the case, since the top dust filters shouldn't even be there.

So lets get to my case. I wanted the front, top and bottom of the case to be made out of a single bent piece of very thick aluminum just like the Silverstone TJ07. This would make it extremely durable and not too heavy. Unfortunately, such a shape cannot be done in Sketchup as far as I know so here is a picture of the TJ07.

TJ07B-3-4-02.jpg

I'd like my case to be available in all black (ALL black) and silver, just like the good old Cooler Master ATCS 840, Cooler Master Cosmos 1000/1010, Cooler Master Stacker 830/832 and the Silverstone TJ07. My renders don't really have color. Or textures. Oh well.

On the front of the case there are eight optical drive bays. Each one can easily be removed by opening the two little latches on the side and pressing them in on each side. This is the same design as the CM Cosmos 1000/1010/S 1100. The bottom four optical drive bays function as hot swappable drive bays, the same design as the HAF-X. These are not ventilated to keep with the refined look.

Here is an image of a hot swap drive on the HAF-X.
7.jpg

These drive bays would be able to hold a 3.5" device (without tools, it would be like CM's hard drive racks), a 2.5" device (screws) or a 1.8" device (screws).
20.jpg

The image below shows this clearly. Below the drive bays is a pair of 120mm intake fans, hidden behind a removable extruded aluminum plate which has a removable/washable dust filter just like on the ATCS 840. The two images on the left are the front of the case. The one all the way on the left has the bottom four hot swap bays removed and a 120mm intake fan installed instead. So that's three 120mm intake fans.
casej.png

At the top of the front of the case there are two knobs for fan LED and fan speed control (push them in to enable/disable the LEDs). The knob on the left would be for the top and front fans. The one to the right would be for the rest of the fans. To the right of these is a CPU temperature monitor. All of this is inspired by the EVGA SR-2 case (designed by Cooler Master based on the ATCS 840). All the way on the right would be an engraved logo/trademark.

I forgot to include the front panel mounting system. It would be secured by three latches on each side, just like on the HAF-X.

The image in the center shows the rear of the case. On the top of the rear, you have two rubberized holes which allow a water cooling system's tubes to pass through. Below this is where the motherboard's I/O shield plate would be installed. Next to these are two 120mm rear exhaust fans, covered by a typical removable fan grill for easy maintenance. I forgot to include something though - there would be two thumbscrews on the top of the back of the case. These would secure the top panel, the same design as the ATCS 840.

Below the two rear fans (where a 240mm radiator can be installed) are 11 meshed expansion slots, another vertical expansion slot with extra ventilation next to it (depicted as a rectangle) and below these are four more rubberized holes which allow a water cooling system's tubes to pass through.

Below all of this are two standard ATX power supply mounts which are vertical, just like the Silverstone TJ07. Each has an aluminum cover on by default which have two more rubberized holes which allow a water cooling system's tubes to pass through.

I forgot to include the side panel secure systems. I would prefer a system like the CM Cosmos cases. Push a lever to release a side panel. There would be one on each side for each side panel. To secure the panel, line it up and push it in. The Corsair Obsidian 800D and 700D have this design, but they use a button instead of a lever and the side panel doesn't just drop off upon release. Also I would like the surrounding area for the edges of the side panels to have a rubber lining, to absorb vibrations.

The image second from the right shows the top of the case. At the very front of the top of the case you have a power button, power LED, HDD activity LED and the reset button. The rectangle behind this conceals a flip-up I/O panel just like the ATCS 840. This I/O panel would include two USB 3.0 ports, two USB 2.0 ports, two e-SATA ports, a firewire port, a headphone jack and a microphone jack.

Behind all of this is a whole lot of ventilation, similar to the ATCS 840. This is secured by two thumbscrews on the rear of the case as I said earlier. Removing the top would allow for direct access to the top fans. One 200mm top exhaust fan would be included (back mount). Another one can be mounted, or up to four 120mm or 140mm fans can be used instead (or up to a 480mm/560mm radiator although there are no 560 rads yet as far as I know).

Here is a picture of the top panel being removed on the ATCS 840.
ATC840_13.jpg

The image on the far right shows the bottom of the case. At the front there is a small dust filter which would be secured by 2 screws. This is for the front fan, so it can draw air from the bottom as well. Yet another design taken from the ATCS 840. There are four rubberized feet which would be tall enough to allow some airflow to bottom mounted fans. That square is a bottom intake vent.

So lets look at the side of the case shall we?
casesides.png

The left image shows the left side panel. The large window represents a window which would show off the motherboard area. The little rectangle at the front is an air intake scoop for an internal 120mm fan (more on this later). This would have a dust filter secured by two screws. The bottom is full of ventilation. The right side panel is the same thing but no window. This design is based on the Silverstone TJ07, TJ09 and TJ10.

The inside of the case is where it gets more interesting. So lets have a look.
caseinterior.png

Woah. So what do we have here? Eyes on the left image please.

At the front you see two 120mm intake fans. One feeds the hard drives and another feeds a 120mm fan directly in front of it. The latter fan is the one that would benefit from the side intake scoops. Above this is a VGA air duct which is based on the one in the Cooler Master HAF-X. This tool free air duct can hold either a 120mm x 25mm fan or a 120mm x 38mm fan. It would channel air to up to four video cards (opposed to three on the HAF-X). It was designed by Cooler Master and NVIDIA themselves for the GTX 400 series video cards.

Here is an image of the HAF-X VGA air duct. Since this case is so much longer (SR-2 ready), you'd want a powerful 120mm x 38mm fan. NVIDIA recommends a 150 CFM fan for the HAF-X.
9e.jpg

Lets look at the bottom. As we see it is a compartmentalized design just like the Silverstone TJ07. So on the bottom two ATX PSUs are mounted vertically. They would draw in fresh air from the side panels which have dust filters covering all of the ventilation. The two circles represent 120mm intake fans. These would be mounted on a door that swings open. The dust filters are on the side panel so they are easy to clean.

Opening these little doors would reveal the hard drive racks which would be similar to Cooler Master's. There are three of these behind each 120mm fan - 6 total, each 3 in their own column. These racks use a tool free design. Pull them out, secure a 3.5" device on them by putting it in place, and slide the rack back in. This rack has four rubber sound dampeners, and if you wish you'd be able to screw in a 2.5" or 1.8" device into each one.

To the left of this is a 120mm bottom intake fan that feeds air into another 120mm intake fan above it (on the top of the compartment separator). The latter fan would feed air right into the fan of a video card. The bottom intake fan would have an external dust filter that slides out to the side of the case, just like on the ATCS 840 and I forgot to design this. Oh well.

Behind the bottom intake fan are the two vertical ATX power supply mounts. ATX power supplies with 120mm or larger fans would draw fresh air through the ventilated side panels which have dust filters.

The motherboard has two CPU retention plate access holes. This allows you to access the backplate of a CPU cooler/water block without removing the motherboard. To the left of these you see the two 120mm exhaust fans (supports up to a 240mm radiator) and on the top you see the 200mm exhaust fan. As I said earlier you can use two 200mm top fans, up to four 120mm/140mm top fans or up to a 480mm radiator.

You can see the 11 expansion slots which would be secured by thumbscrews (including the 12th vertical one).

To the right of the CPU retention holes are three cable management holes. You can see one - the one below it and one behind that one are covered by the VGA air duct. The VGA air duct sticks out a lot though (to fit around video cards) so the cable management holes are still usable. The little rectangles represent notches that allow cables to be tied onto the motherboard tray. See this image (near the cable management holes).
9c.jpg

The motherboard tray would be removable via 4 thumbscrews on the back of the case. It would slide on its own ball bearing tray. Based on the Cooler Master ATCS 840.

The top four optical drive bays would feature two of Cooler Master's button locks. Push the button to release it and secure it. Tool free. Cooler Master includes these only on the left side. I would like them on both sides. So eight total opposed to four. The bottom four optical drive bay mounts are for the hot swappable bays. If you wish to use these as optical drive bays (or reservoir mounts) you would have to use thumbscrews, screws or spare button locks.

The render on the right of that same image is the same thing but with a VGA support bracket installed. This support bracket would be just like the one included with the HAF-X, but larger and features a 120mm fan mount instead of an 80mm fan mount. See the HAF-X version below.
42.jpg
9e.jpg

I guess that's it. We have an awesome water cooling case - up to a 480mm radiator would be able to be mounted onto the bottom compartment (a 480mm radiator would require use of only one PSU). You can also use a 360mm radiator at the bottom in tandem with a 480 rad if you have your hard drives moved to the optical drive bays. Then you can have up to a 480mm/560mm radiator on the top, a 240mm radiator on the rear and a 360mm/420mm radiator on the back of the drive bays if you ditch the VGA air duct.

As for air cooling, you have a decent amount of air being channeled to your video cards and a positive air pressure setup. Not bad, much better than the Corsair Obsidian 800D/700D, Silverstone TJ07 and even the Cooler Master ATCS 840. You also have positive air pressure unless you go and kill yourself with two top fans.

Now if only I was actually good at rendering.

Quote
Posted : 05/06/2010 8:46 pm
strudinox
(@strudinox)
BOT Admin

I like that you took all the strong features out of several cases and combined them into one feature-packed case. I like the overall concept and design. This case DEFINITELY does not lack airflow and seems like it would have everything any WC/AC enthusiast would want. I wonder if we can find someone who knows CAD to draw up a rough design of it. I could work with C4D and see what I could come up with...

+REP πŸ™‚

ReplyQuote
Posted : 05/06/2010 9:06 pm
Joe
 Joe
(@joe)
Assended

I'll have a pop with Solidworks if I can errrr... find it.

Would be sweet if we can get yours + Clam's case made πŸ™‚

Took me about an hour to read, looks perfect. If a little big πŸ˜›

+REP

ReplyQuote
Posted : 06/06/2010 8:02 am
Jester
(@jester)
Member Moderator

Thanks maybe I'll get around to making it one day.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 06/06/2010 8:22 am
Jonsp
(@jonsp)
Pirate

I'm not in the mood for reading paragraphs at the moment, but from what I can see, that looks really cool.
You're obviously really into this stuff, you should get round to making it somehow. Would be a pretty cool project to work on.
Then you just sell it to CM and make your millions.. It's as easy as that... obviously πŸ˜‰

ReplyQuote
Posted : 06/06/2010 8:28 am
iiNNeX
(@iiNNeX)
GODLIKE

Too long I am too tired to read it atm but damn looks good. You must have had some free time to make all that lol πŸ™‚

ReplyQuote
Posted : 06/06/2010 8:40 am
Jester
(@jester)
Member Moderator

Yes lots of free time lol. I designed another case already. Meet the Mountain Mods killer. And yes this one has color! I'll color the other one later.

There are four 120mm front intake fans which have an easily removable dust filter (fans are mounted inside of the case). You can use up to two 480mm radiators right here. There are 16 easily removable optical drive bays, four hot swap bays, power button, reset button, two fan speed control/LED buttons, HDD activity LED and power LED on the front. The box below these buttons is the I/O panel which would have two USB 3.0 ports, two USB 2.0 ports, a firewire port, two e-SATA ports, a headphone jack and a microphone jack.
cubefront.png

Well... there are six rubberized feet on the bottom of the case. I forgot to include ventilation for the 120mm bottom intake fan.
cubebottom.png

The top is empty except for the 8 120mm exhaust fans or two 480mm radiators. They use a typical removable fan grill for easy maintenance/installation.
cubetop.png

The sides are very similar to before, however now they are more identical. Each side has lots of ventilation with dust filters, a window, air intake scoops (with dust filters) and the left side has three 120mm intake fans.
cubesides.png

The back of the case is very interesting. All the way on the right are six rubberized holes for a water cooling system's tubes to pass through, a window and four ATX power supply mounts. There are 10 120mm fan mounts therefore you can use up to one 480mm radiator, one 360mm radiator and two 240mm radiators. There are 11 horizontal expansion slots and one vertical expansion slot below the motherboard I/O shield plate mount. Next to the vertical expansion slot are four rubberized holes for a water cooling system's tubes to pass through, and at the top left are six more of these rubberized holes and passive ventilation.
cuberear.png

The interior is like before but bigger. You can't see much - remember how wide the case is. The motherboard tray is like before but bigger. This time the cable management holes are visible but I forgot to include the cable tie notches. Just like before this aluminum tray can be removed via four thumbscrews and slides on a ball bearing tray. There are two CPU retention plate access holes. All optical drive bays (16 total) are installed to the left of the motherboard tray area. These would use Cooler Master's button locks on each side. You can see that the front 120mm fans (top row) are mounted internally with another 120mm fan on the opposite side of each front fan. The bottom row of 120mm front intake fans (the last 4) blow towards the hard drives. Notice the compartmentalized design and up to six hard drives can be installed on the bottom, or a 480mm radiator and a 360mm radiator. The PSUs are mounted horizontally - one can draw in fresh air from the side panels.
cubeinterior.png

Notice on the compartment separator two 120mm fans blow air towards the video card area. This air is drawn in through the side panels and a bottom intake fan.

I'll build this case if anything. πŸ˜€

ReplyQuote
Posted : 06/06/2010 11:58 am
Jonsp
(@jonsp)
Pirate

That case is huge :p
You could fit a serious amount of kit in there, lol.
Looks good. I'd love to see you build it. πŸ™‚
Nice work.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 06/06/2010 5:47 pm
strudinox
(@strudinox)
BOT Admin

I want one that looks like this:

hyper-cooler-pc-case1_2263.jpg

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Posted : 06/06/2010 6:38 pm
Enad
 Enad
(@enad)
Member Moderator

Yeah that many fans would help keep my 4870x2 cool in this heat. πŸ™

So Jester, when this is getting mass produced....Everyone on GND is getting one for free right? πŸ˜€

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Posted : 07/06/2010 11:34 am
strudinox
(@strudinox)
BOT Admin

When I get my comp working again, I'll design your first one. I'll pump it out in C4d. Yes, I am cool like that.

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Posted : 07/06/2010 11:40 am
Enad
 Enad
(@enad)
Member Moderator

Ahhh. Your computer actually isn't working anymore now?
Not good. :v

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Posted : 07/06/2010 11:43 am
strudinox
(@strudinox)
BOT Admin

Yep it died. If it doesn't crash on startup, it will crash < 5 minutes of being up.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 07/06/2010 11:46 am
Sonex
(@sonex)
Padawan

Aside from the fan case sounding like a jet plane I think it would be awesome!

ReplyQuote
Posted : 15/04/2011 5:30 pm
wannebegamer
(@wannebegamer)
Padawan

you could install the new cm-fans ( turbine ones I think... ) πŸ™‚

ReplyQuote
Posted : 21/04/2011 8:29 am
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