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Article: VisionTek Killer 2100 & HD 5770 "Graphics-Network" Card

strudinox
(@strudinox)
BOT Admin

You can view the page at http://www.gnd-tech.com/main/content/482-VisionTek-Killer-2100-HD-5770-Graphics-Network-Card

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Topic starter Posted : 02/12/2010 12:16 am
Spaiker
(@spaiker)
Ninja

@ wrote:

I don't see the use of an 'extra' network card. The onboard is just fine, they did prove that that 'gamer network card' some time ago, did not have any good influence on performance. I don't think you'll be filling your (100Mbit?)/1Gbit line soon with the current ISP's 😆

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Posted : 02/12/2010 4:20 am
Joe
 Joe
(@joe)
Assended

Actually, me and Jester both own a Killer 2100. They're great 🙂

Reduce ping, and add like 1FPS in games. But the software's where it really matters. You can prioritize downloads/programs so you'll get decent speeds.

Check Jester's review here 🙂

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Posted : 02/12/2010 4:27 am
Spaiker
(@spaiker)
Ninja

@ wrote:

Yes but your ping is the connection between you and the server, right? AFAIK such a card doesn't bring you closer to the server?:tongue:
Ok, the prioritising of downloads/programs can influence speed, you won't hear me disagreeing 😎

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Posted : 02/12/2010 7:38 am
SJentZ
(@sjentz)
Ninja

@Spaiker 49586 wrote:

Yes but your ping is the connection between you and the server, right? AFAIK such a card doesn't bring you closer to the server?:tongue:
Ok, the prioritising of downloads/programs can influence speed, you won't hear me disagreeing 😎

I heard something about it using a different OS that let it go "Behind" windows security without delay while gaming, so it does actually kinda bring down ping 😀

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Posted : 02/12/2010 8:30 am
Arrakiv
(@arrakiv)
Leveling Up

Well, I don't really want to throw the thread off topic, but I guess I'll explain in my normal blar-onto-the-page fashion:

The card runs an embedded OS (linux-based) that offloads network packets to a Network Processing Unit (a happy little CPU attached to the card). This has a side benefit of removing the network load from your CPU to the card, but far more importantly lets the OS on the card manage all of your traffic immensely more efficiently than Windows.

Why is this helpful? Because Windows isn't efficient with networking. It cannot differentiate one packet from another, and it jams them haphazardly into its really poor Network Stack, where it waits in queue for its turn to be processed. Your computer, while it is connected to the Internet, is sending a variety of packets all the time, which means your game packets are always waiting in this queue, and sometimes for quite a while (relative to networking, obviously ;-)). Ping time is the time it takes for a packet to get from point A to point B, but you have to keep in mind that there is actually a lot of network processing being done in your machine (and the server), and that a surprisingly significant amount of time in a packets life can actually be spent 'within' your machine. Point "A" isn't the port on computer - it is the program that is sending out the packet. This minimizes that. Doesn't fix the 'net, doesn't move you closer, doesn't warp space and time (totally getting there some day! Or maybe Quantum Packets... hm...), but it does fix that part. As a result, you end up with lower ping times because your packets aren't waiting in a queue, you don't end up with nearly as much stuttering and hitching issues in games, and you even can get a nice FPS boost.

Back in the day, people liked to make the claim that the cards didn't do a whole lot. Admittedly, our earlier products weren't tested enough, weren't effective enough, were really expensive, etc... Which regretfully was a big part of the problem with being a small start up with super limited resources. There also wasn't a real easy way of testing the card for reviews and such either.

Currently, we've been able to ramp up our development significantly, vastly increase the amount of QA that goes into the cards, ensure that the experience is a much better one for our users, and cut down the price from our initial launch as a company immensely (I could get a 2100 for less than what I paid for my keyboard, mouse, and G13 individually). We've been able to include some great software that works because of the capabilities of the card, that gives you some serious control over your networking (I really do enjoy streaming Netflix, running a torrent, and playing a bit of TF2 at the same time), and reviewers have been much, much more pleased with the results. So have users - we've got 4/5 eggs on Newegg with our latest, best, and cheapest card yet, out of something like 50 user reviews.

Regretfully it is a lot easier to dig a hole than to dig out of one. 😉

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Posted : 02/12/2010 9:58 am
Jester
(@jester)
Member Moderator

@ wrote:

Thanks for the clarification Arrakiv, and nice innovative product here.

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Posted : 02/12/2010 12:07 pm
strudinox
(@strudinox)
BOT Admin

Great explanation! Thanks for clearing that up. :good:

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Topic starter Posted : 03/12/2010 11:41 am
Joe
 Joe
(@joe)
Assended

@Arrakiv 49616 wrote:

Well, I don't really want to throw the thread off topic, but I guess I'll explain in my normal blar-onto-the-page fashion:

.....

Cheers for coming over and explaining that to us 🙂

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Posted : 03/12/2010 11:43 am
Samson
(@samson)
Ninja

Awesome move from both companies making an all in one card like that. But no sound card and USB3 hookups?? 😀

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Posted : 05/12/2010 12:22 am
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