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Article: Themalright Shaman Review

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BabyBalla
(@babyballa)
Guru

You can view the page at http://www.gnd-tech.com/main/content/511-Themalright-Shaman-Review

Quote
Topic starter Posted : 20/12/2010 11:42 am
strudinox
(@strudinox)
BOT Admin

Impressive results! Nice writeup as well 😀

That things got more heat pipes than most CPU coolers LOL

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Posted : 20/12/2010 11:59 am
BabyBalla
(@babyballa)
Guru

@ wrote:

haha yeah

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Topic starter Posted : 20/12/2010 12:02 pm
Jester
(@jester)
Member Moderator

@ wrote:

That's because no CPU comes close to the heat output of some of these GPUs. Great writeup,

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Posted : 20/12/2010 12:04 pm
Spaiker
(@spaiker)
Ninja

The amount of heatpipes says only few things about the real cooling performance 😉 It's too big for me, Where am I gonna put my soundcard and my 2nd GPU lol.
Nicely written!

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Posted : 20/12/2010 12:51 pm
Jester
(@jester)
Member Moderator

The amount and construction of heat pipes as well as the base material/finish determine how much and how well heat will be transferred. But yeah it isn't for mGPU setups in standard cases and standard motherboards. If you have one of those quad GPU ready cases and motherboards, you'd be fine. 🙂

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Posted : 20/12/2010 1:02 pm
strudinox
(@strudinox)
BOT Admin

Can it be flipped upside-down like the old thermalright coolers, so the heat sink is on top of the GPU?

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Posted : 20/12/2010 1:30 pm
Spartan
(@spartan)
Ninja

@ wrote:

Looks pretty good, impressive results too ;3

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Posted : 20/12/2010 1:44 pm
Jester
(@jester)
Member Moderator

@strudinox 52476 wrote:

Can it be flipped upside-down like the old thermalright coolers, so the heat sink is on top of the GPU?

I see no way. With Thermalright's other GPU coolers it was easy - all you needed to do was flip it over and install it. But if you do this with the Shaman, as you can see it won't get you any such result. I don't think the cooler can be dismantled and reassembled so that it could be installed in such a way, nor have I seen it done so I assume the unfortunate answer is no.

There is a reason to this limitation. The heat pipes are configured the way they are because they get to the fins quickly for faster heat dissipation. They made the fin array wider than most other coolers so that it could support 140mm fans (their new TY-140 more specifically). They didn't want to make it too wide so that it wouldn't fit in many computer cases. If the heat pipes were arranged like the HR-03 GTX, then they'd have to extend outwards quite a bit so that it could support a 140mm fan. This would make it too large.

But what they should have done in my opinion is leave the heat pipe configuration like the HR-03 GTX except use eight of them like on the Shaman. The fin density and design should be like the Shaman but rather than making it wide for 140mm fan support, it should just be longer and include dual 120mm fans. Much larger fin surface area with 100% active cooling? Okay! Screw 140mm fans - most of them are poorly constructed with the exception of the TY-140 which is not a good high performance fan as the review demonstrates. Its RPM is just too low.

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Posted : 20/12/2010 2:17 pm
Samson
(@samson)
Ninja

@ wrote:

Very nice pictures. I like the numbers this cooler produces, but sacrificing that many slots is hard. What I think would be cool is instead of the heat pipes wrapping around 180 degrees, make them wrap 90 degrees, and lift it so the cooler is directly over the top of the GPU. That way it looks like a "T" This way it covers all your other expansion slots, takes up almost no room, and leaves room for SLI. not to mention it could help provide additional cooling to your other expansion cards.

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Posted : 20/12/2010 7:41 pm
Darken1
(@darken1)
Jedi

Great review!
Too bad that cooler is so large, i like the performance.

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Posted : 20/12/2010 8:25 pm
BabyBalla
(@babyballa)
Guru

@Samson 52552 wrote:

Very nice pictures. I like the numbers this cooler produces, but sacrificing that many slots is hard. What I think would be cool is instead of the heat pipes wrapping around 180 degrees, make them wrap 90 degrees, and lift it so the cooler is directly over the top of the GPU. That way it looks like a "T" This way it covers all your other expansion slots, takes up almost no room, and leaves room for SLI. not to mention it could help provide additional cooling to your other expansion cards.

Like i said. If you were going for single card cooling solution this would be perfect. TBH unless you actually have plans for the other slots i wouldn't consider it a con.

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Topic starter Posted : 21/12/2010 9:07 am
Spaiker
(@spaiker)
Ninja

I lolled when reading this on the site of ThermalRight:

Quote:
The TY-140 can be pluged into the 3 pin; you can tell from the jack, there is fool-proof design on the jack so wrong installation of the pins are avoided.

how does this cooler cools the VRM's? I know the TT Pro has had some difficulties cooling the VRM's of my HD5850, and same with the VDDC. Are those heatsinks you can put on them really that good?

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Posted : 21/12/2010 1:38 pm
Jester
(@jester)
Member Moderator

They have VRM heat sinks yes, but the only way to measure VRM temps is by adding your own temperature sensor to them. Other reviews show that Thermalright coolers, the Shaman included, actually cool the VRM better than the stock cooler whereas other aftermarket coolers (Arctic Cooling Accelero Xtreme/Plus included) raise them by up to 10 degrees Celsius. With my Shaman (which my lazy ass has yet to install, I'll get it done before Friday) I'm using a VRM-G2 which as you can see is an actively cooled (I'll be using an Panaflo U1 80mm) tower VRM heat sink with dual 6mm nickel plated copper heat pipes. The fin design shows that it can also operate well in passive mode but screw that. This will be good for my overclocks, that's for sure. It's a shame it doesn't point toward the rear case fan like their other VRM heat sinks and at the moment no other Fermi card is supported.

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Posted : 21/12/2010 2:06 pm
Jester
(@jester)
Member Moderator

Here is an update with my results. No pics yet because I don't want to give you crappy cell phone pics - you'll have to wait for the good stuff which won't be for a few days. I installed the Shaman using Arctic Cooling MX-4 paste and followed their recommended installation instructions. I also used a VRM-G2 so the testing GPU was my GTX 480. Case and airflow setup are as follows.

  • Cooler Master ATCS 840 case
  • 3x 120mm Front Intake Fans
  • 3x 120mm Intake Fans on the back of the drive bays
  • 1x 120mm Bottom Intake Fan (on bottom PSU mount, blowing straight toward GPU)
  • 1x 120mm Fan on Prolimatech Megahalems (pull - blowing out to rear case fan slot)
  • 1x 230mm Top Exhaust Fan

I have a Delta FFB1212EH installed on the Shaman (120mm x 25mm, 4000 RPM/150 CFM/56 DBA/12.43 mmH20) and a Panaflo U1 80mm x 25mm fan installed on the VRM-G2 (3450 RPM/46.9 CFM/38.2 DBA). Now as for testing, I ran the EVGA OC Scanner at fullscreen (1920 x 1080), enabled power draw and artifact scanner. I ran this for 30 minutes. I tested the stock GTX 480 cooler at 100% and the Shaman with the Delta FFB1212EH. I tested my GTX 480 at stock clocks and voltage (700.5/1401/925 987 mV) and overclocked (825/1650/1000 1138 mV).

resultsh.jpg

So with the stock cooler at 100% and stock clocks, the GPU topped out at 70 degrees Celsius with the PCB at 50 degrees Celsius. The Shaman with the same settings gave us 56 degrees Celsius on the GPU core and 40 degrees Celsius on the PCB. Therefore, that's a reduction of 14 degrees Celsius for the GPU core and 10 degrees for the PCB.

Overclocked results may seem disappointing but you must realize something. A GTX 480 at stock clocks and voltage, when stress tested like this, has been shown to output roughly 300W of heat. With this overclock you're looking at quite a bit more than that. So the stock cooler failed to complete the overclocked test - temps soared to over 105 degrees Celsius after a few minutes. The Shaman passed showing 101 degrees Celsius on the GPU core and 52 degrees Celsius on the PCB.

Gaming and benchmarking temps are down about 20 degrees Celsius so I can now bench with higher overclocks. I already have and I'll post up some scores later.

SCORES:

The Shaman's backplate does cover a bit of the slot above it, however I can use my Killer 2100 there just by removing the black plastic shroud.

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Posted : 24/12/2010 2:14 pm
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